Republic of Georgia Tasting

The Republic of Georgia is often considered to be the birthplace of viticulture and winemaking, dating back 8000 years. The earliest form of winemaking there involves macerating and aging in clay vessels called Qvevri, which are buried underground. In essence, these are the first “natural” wines, in that there is no use of chemicals, foreign yeasts, or filtration. This practice is so vital to understanding early winemaking that it has been added to UNESCO’s “List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.” Thankfully, there are a number of wineries in Georgia who continue to make wine in this traditional manner. On Wednesday, December 14th, we’ll be pouring 4 Qvevri-style wines (1 white without skin contact, 2 “amber” or orange wines, and 1 red), all newly arrived to the U.S., all amazing examples of what makes these wines so unique. Joining us is one of our favorite people, Eric Danch from Blue Danube Wine Company, whose knowledge of Georgian wines never ceases to amaze us!

From southeastern Georgia, we’ll be featuring two wines from the Shavnabada Monastery -- the 2004 Mtsvane which spent 6 months fermented on the skins and then 11 years in Qvevri, and the 2009 Saperavi, which spent 6 years in Qvevri. Grown and produced by monks, bottled by hand, sealed with beeswax, and blessed! From Eastern Georgia, we’ll be pouring a Kisi, one of the rarest white grapes, from the winery Doqi, which has 6 months of skin contact. And from high up in the hills of the Asureti Valley, we’ll be pouring the native white varietal Chinuri from Gotsa winery.

Shavnabada Mtsvane 2004
Shavnabada Saperavi 2009
doqi Kisi Qvevri 2014
Gotsa Wines Chinuri 2015

Flight of four wines, $15
As always, featured wines are for sale at 10% off to tasting participants, during the event only.
Wednesday, December 14th, 5:00-7:00pm

Photo Credit: Blue Danube Wine